Arkansas Master Naturalists
NWAMN SCOOPS THE AWARDS! Print
General News
Written by Ken Leonard   
The Northwest Arkansas Master Naturalists scooped the awards at the Beaver Lake - Lake Smart / Stream Smart Project. The NWAMN chapter took the Organization of the Year Award, The Volunteer of the Year Award and the Stream Smart Team of the Year Award. The NWAMN are monitoring over 50% of the stream monitoring sites and the NWAMN have identified new sites and recruited new teams to sample the sites.
The Beaver Lake - Lake Smart / Stream Smart Project run by Ozarks Water Watch and the Beaver Lake Water District is monitoring the Beaver Lake watershed.  The project is building a data base that will be used to identify potential pollution issues and water quality changes in the watershed. Beaver Lake and its watershed is very important resource in Northwest Arkansas and its protection is extremely important. Beaver Lake supplies almost all of the water for the approximately 500,000 folks that live in NWA and Oklahoma.
Last Updated on Monday, 20 October 2014 19:29
 
Daisy Nature Trail Maintenance Print
Diamond Lakes Arkansas Master Naturalists
Written by Dave Fastenow   


Jim Baggenstoss and Darrel Hill traveled to Daisy State Park to do some routine maintenance on the Daisy Nature Trail. They had to convince Jim to wear some shoes though!

The maintenance included lopping, blowing, weed eating, and blaze painting.  They also inspected previously installed bluebird boxes and cleaned/ repaired where needed.
In addition they installed a butterfly overwintering box in the perennial garden behind the Visitor Center.

Darrell took all the teasing that was forked out during the day (quite a bit actually!) with a sense of humor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tamara Lunsford ( Park Superintendent ) and Emily Young (Asst. Park Supt) were there to meet the group and to give a first hand look at the trail.  They also had an opportunity to identify a couple of trees that we were trying to pinpoint with a name --- Jim thinks they are Chinese Chestnuts.


Tamara also offered the group some left over lumber pieces to use at our discretion. This supply was gladly loaded up and will be turned into some great wildlife housing.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 23 September 2014 09:29
 
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